Massachusetts Beautiful

BY
WALLACE NUTTING

ILLUSTRATED BY THE AUTHOR
WITH THREE HUNDRED AND FOUR PICTURES
COVERING ALL THE COUNTIES IN MASSACHUSETTS



FRAMINGHAM
OLD AMERICA COMPANY
PUBLISHERS

COPYRIGHT 1923
BY WALLACE NUTTING

THE PLIMPTON PRESS
NORWOOD, MASS U.S.A.

FOREWORD

THE author's book on Vermont in this series of the States Beautiful covered largely a virgin field. It will at once occur to many that a new book on Massachusetts will with difficulty establish its right to exist. It is true that a great many illustrated books have been issued on the old houses and haunts of Massachusetts. However, there still remain numerous picturesque cottages which have never been shown in any volume. Even some of the stately houses have not been depicted except externally. The interior of a good house is or ought to be far more interesting than the exterior.

There has not, however, at any time, so far as we are aware, been an effort to set forth the picturesque landscapes of the state in extensive fashion. If one gathered up all the old wood cuts of Massachusetts scenery he would have a large and meritorious collection. Nearly all the pictures in this book are now published in book form for the first time and most of them are entirely new.

The effort to cover the entire state in a series of pictures of this sort does indeed lay one open to the charge that he has treated the subject too briefly. It is like finding fault with a clergyman for making his sermon too short, and must be taken as a compliment.

Two main ideas have been kept in mind in the preparation of this book. The first idea is that of avoiding any appreciable encroachment on what appears in other works. The second idea is to place before the public scenes with which they are not generally familiar but which merit attention.

It has seemed entirely inappropriate to refer at length to historical matters. Pictures of a very few famous localities are included, but history is left to the abundant works on the subject.

Little should be looked for of literary merit in a work of this kind. If the text is understandable, the reader will kindly consider that he has value received in the pictures. The text must necessarily aim chiefly at the description of the localities shown, and to such experiences or incidents as are connected therewith.

A desire expressed by many that pictures should be titled has been met in this volume and will be met in volumes which we hope will follow. From a very wide experience in titling pictures the author is persuaded that not one person in a multitude can find from its title the spot pictured. The author finds it difficult to get the exact viewpoint a second time.

It is a pleasure to a reader to know that a certain composition was found in his home town, whether or not he recognizes the spot. Of course, these remarks do not apply to features like mountains but they apply to almost every other composition.

Having spent some years in each one of the New England States the author feels at home in all of them.

The author has personally found and pictured all the themes set forth in this work. This originality of theme is not maintained to be a merit but it does set forth the subject in a fresh way.

It is true that many delightful scenes depicted by others might have been obtained for this book. The time may come when it will be found desirable to engage collaborators in this series, but in the present work the author is entirely responsible for all defects.

WALLACE NUTTING
Framingham, Massachusetts



TO
THE MEMORY OF
THE FOUNDERS OF MASSACHUSETTS


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